Hello Everyone!

We are the proud parent of a 6 month old male pug. Everything about him is just wonderful except for the biting and chewing on body parts or clothing. We really need your help. He starts out playing with you but after awhile he will start chewing on your hands and feet when you're playing with him. He bites so hard sometimes that he draws blood. But I'm not sure if he knows what he's doing because he's not barking or growling and he wags his little tail the whole time. Also if you're wearing long pants or socks in the house he will latch onto the bottom of the pant leg or sock and starts to pull them, like he's playing tug-o-war. and he always attacks my hair. I have long hair and he'll try to dig thro my hair and chew it. We've tried several brands of chew prevention spray including bitter apple, but it doesn't seem to phase him at all. We've tried enforcing "No" and putting him in timeout but nothing has worked. Please, anyone with tips for helping would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks...
Proud Parents, Whitney and Tommy

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Oh no... you too? We're also looking for help with this. Our 3 mo. old, max, does the same thing!
I'll be watching to see if anything comes up here and will share with you any tips we may find.
HELP!!!! I am in need of some Help as well. Ready to have a complete breakdown because he wont stop biting. I have tried "NO" also bitter apple spray, even yelped like a dog. It worked for a short time and he seems to be back to the start of the biting again. Milo is 13weeks old and I am stressed to the MAX. So please if you know of anything that can help I would also like to know.

Megan
Hahaha, well I guess its a pug thing. Penny does the same thing. She bites at my heels when she wants to play. She's gotten much better though. Whenever she chews on something that isn't hers, I enforcing "No" and then give her something that is hers (i.e. bone, squeaky animal.) I treat her more like a child instead of a dog. After giving her a toy, I say "Yes, this is your toy." I know she is teething and doesn't understand what is ok to chew and what is not ok to chew. So far its worked, she now is understanding what her toys are and what isn't. I hope this helps!
I am an canine psychologist, and I can help you with this. Chewing and "Mouthing" are common in puppies because the chewing actually stimulates the loss of baby teeth and again stimulates the growth of adult teeth. Without chewing, the puppy will have severe mouth problems later on. This is a common occurance in ALL puppies. A toy or your arm are the same thing to your dog. Always remember the tone of your voice makes a big difference in how you dicipline your dog. Yelling or using an louder excited voice only excites the dog more. A LOW FIRM CALM voice is always going to be more effective. Any toy given at this time that makes a squeeking noise will also make things more excited as the squeeking noise immulates the "squeeling" noise made by small animals during the hunting process. (Back to the pack mentality here) Consistance and patience are all that are needed. A method called scruffing is very effective. WITH VERY GENTLE PRESSURE move the dogs head to the floor and hold there, a low sharp no, and wait for the dog to relax. Most puppies will wiggle, while you have one hand on your puppies neck area, lay your other hand GENTLYon their bottom This will help hold the puppy still. After the dog relaxes, release, but make no vocal noises to the dog after this method. If it happens again, scruff again, as many times as you have to in order for the puppy to walk away or roll over on his/her back. This is mimicking the mother dog's diciplinary techniques. This technique will take several tries to be effective so don't get impatient. It will work. REMEMBER UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES HURT THE ANIMAL IN ANY WAY. I DO NOT ADVOCATE THE USAGE OF VIOLENCE VERBAL OR OTHERWISE IN ORDER TO CORRECT AN UNWANTED BEHAVIOR. you can check out my credentials on my page here......let me know if you need any further help.
Denise Hutson
Hi, I am glad to say that all these phases do stop. When we got our Hektor we were truly sure that he was well named, because no ACHILLES heel was safe. He chewed everything he could get his mouth round which included the bottom of the newel on the stair and a small wooden chest. None of the chew deterrents worked, he was never left unsupervised or we would have lost a lot more. He had, and still has a lot of toys and his favourites are his three nylabones, 2 which are wolf sized. Now just over a year later, he can be safely left anywhere in the home. He has even stopped biting us to tell us he needed out, he will still nip you if you ignore the play signals. So time is the cure, but if you can't wait, get him or her friendly with a crate,and you will never regret it.
Crating a puppy is not advisable as punishment for the chewing stage. Most over the counter deterrents do not work, but in most cases the canine will stop chewing or "mouthing" when the last molars are cut. If addressed early and correctly, one can avoid possible destruction of household or personal items. Time may or may not be the cure, each case is different and should be approached as such, but for those owners that have tried everything else and are truly having a problem that may be causing the possible forfeiture of the canine, if not addressed in an appropriate manner , in 80% of cases the behavior will continue or manifest itself in other ways as the canine grows older. This is why many adolescent canines end up in shelters or euthanized, they "mouth" which most owners interpret as biting, Crating should only be used for toilet training, as a safe shelter or haven for a spooky dog, a sleeping place or when owner feels uncomfortable leaving the canine out when the owner is not present, never as punishment. It is the owners call at all times as to what level the behavior becomes a problem, for some, playful nipping, pushing or shoving is OK, for some it is not. Being a canine psychologist, I have canines in my care that exibit behaviors that to most owners cannot be managed, but to me, they are tolerable. Whatever is comfortable for the owner, each owner will know his own dog and to what level the behavior becomes a problem, and to what level the modification needs to take. Always remember.....when raising a puppy, you are teaching manners that are acceptable to you as well as others that may come in contact with your beautiful baby.

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